Replacing pressure regulator on Husky Air Scout compressor

Today we have a repair that’s somewhat off-topic for the typical posts here. But hey, it broke, got fixed- might as well document for others. Plus it has some wires inside- that counts!

Husky AirScout

This particular failure – pressure regulator not holding air is not new for me. When this unit was purchased new, the regulator failed immediately and had to be replaced under warranty. The manufacturer was nice enough to ship me the parts and I swapped it out. Now, a few years of very infrequent usage later I was back to the same exact failure. So here is a step by step list of how I replaced it:

  1. Ordered part #SUN-3110375 (Pressure regulator) from www.ordertree.com as directed by tech support. At the time of this post, the price was $15 + shipping
  2.  Bought a long phillips screwdriver- it is needed to reach recessed screws in the cover

    Long screwdriver is needed

    Long screwdriver is needed

  3. Disconnected power, air hose and removed visible screws from the back cover perimeter

    Starting disassembly

    Starting dis-assembly

  4. Next the screws near the handle come out

    Handle cover screws

    Handle cover screws- four small ones hold the cover, then two more under it. Also remove two large screws on the cover next to it

  5. Four long screws and washers hold the back of the case- the long screwdriver is required here
    Recessed screws

    Recessed screws

    6. At this point you’d expect the case to come apart but there are two more hidden screws holding things together. To get to them, wheels need to come of:

  1. Remove wheel covers

    Remove wheel covers

    Remove pin and slide wheels off the axis

    Remove pin and slide wheels off the axis

    Now the screws are accessible

    Now the screws are accessible

    7. The back cover can now be removed:

    A look inside

    A look inside- air tank on the left, compressor assembly in the middle, controls on the right

    8. Removing cover over the control panel:

    Remove plastic cover

    Remove plastic cover

9: Now we can get to the pressure regulator assembly. The regulator is not offered individually, so the whole meal rail will have to be replaced:

Pressure regulator rail

Pressure regulator rail – air comes from the tank on the left, goes through pressure switch, pressure regulator, gauge and then out to the hose

10. The assembly is held by two screws from the front, so the label has to be peeled off:

Carefully lifting the sticker

Carefully lifting the sticker

Now the screws are accessible

Now the screws are accessible

11. With the screws removed, it’s time to disconnect the hose side:

Loosen the screw and disconnect the hose

Loosen the screw and disconnect the hose

12. Disconnect grounding straps, using socket wrench:

First ground cable

First ground cable

Second grounding strap

Second grounding strap

13. Disconnect pressure switch:

Pressure switch

Pressure switch

14. Lift out the old assembly. It may be easier if the hose connector is removed first:

Unscrew hose connector

Unscrew hose connector

Removing the assembly

Removing the assembly

15. Install the new assembly with two screws. Reconnect grounding straps:

16. Reconnect pressure switch. Install air hose:

Slide the new hose on

Slide the new hose on

Replace and tighten the clamp

Replace and tighten the clamp

17. Replace rubber hose holder:

Replace rubber holder

Replace rubber holder

18: Reinstall plastic cover

Replace cover

Replace cover

19.Replace the back cover, install all the screws, install wheels. Confirm compressor is now holding and regulating pressure. Repair done (until the regulator fails again..)

20. Here is what the pressure regulator assembly looks like:

The failed assembly

The failed assembly

 

23 thoughts on “Replacing pressure regulator on Husky Air Scout compressor

    • Your website was extremely helpful — Thanks a lot! I google “Air Compressor Model 41004” and your article came right up!

    • Thank You Reagle,

      Without your reply I could not find the part on ordertree. I was about to give up and toss the damn thing, I am getting the feeling there is some design flaw in the thing and I can’t rely on it. For a $15.00 part and $9.00 shipping and handling I will repair it and give it a chance.

      Thank you for your help, Tom Chandler

        • My 91 year old mother uses this to put air in the tires of her garden cart and lawn tractor, if or when this fails again I will replace it with something newer and more reliable I have.
          Her remaining good days are too precious to waste. I only agreed to fix it because her long time next door neighbor gave it to her as a gift the summer before she passed on.

  1. Same unit , I’m need to replace the connector on the unit where the air hose attaches ( it doesn’t click /lock in any longer ) what is this part called and where can i get a replacement ?

    Thank you for any help you can give me

  2. I am assuming all of you have had the same problem I found. The pressure regulator shaft stripped out? I purchased mine at the Goodwill for $15 with this problem. I figured I could fix it, and I did. To make a long story short, without all the BS. This is a Mickey Mouse compressor which calls for a Mickey Mouse fix, sort of, fix.
    This is what I did:
    1. Broke the pressure knob off.
    2. Separated the pressure valve with an 1 3/16″ deep socket.
    3. Removed the plastic piston, w/ 2 o rings, spring and dimpled round pressure disk.
    4 Removed the screw at the end of the adjustment shaft. It is a hex bolt. Mine just broke off. This allows the shaft to be removed from the housing.
    5. I could see the threads had been stripped out of the pot metal housing. Take a 3/8- 16 or finer tap and re-thread the housing. DO NOT DRILL OUT THE HOLE! You will need ALL the material you can get.
    6. Clean up the housing and check you work with the appropriate length bolt. I used one with 1-1/4″ threads. Use a good anti seize lubricant on the threads. I use the Loctite silver.
    7. Reassemble the unit. Reverse the pressure disk so the dimple is point outward as most bolts are concave on the end. Then install the spring and plastic piston. I removed the 2 O-rings and used silicone grease on them. The extended point, in center, with hole goes towards the valve assembly, in case you didn’t pay attention when you took it apart.
    8. Re insert the assembly into the pressure housing. (The $15 ABF) With the 1 3/16”deep socket.
    9. Insert the bolt into the housing to adjust the pressure. You can make your own custom bolt by using a wing nut. Mine worked perfect.
    This took me all of 30 minutes. Most of which was reading the above info. If you take the time replace the entire unit as described above, you will have the same problem over and over again. Reason being, there is no water separator before the pressure regulator and it will always be wet and corrode. The key here using the Loctite silver anti seize. If you have taken the time to do the above, I HIGHLY recommend you get the Loctite and put it on the threads of the new regulator, run it in and out until you have it on all the threads inside and out.
    Or, you can go to Harbor Freight and buy a new compressor for $40 with the workings on the outside where they should be…
    I took pictures and would be happy to send them if you need a pictures.
    More film at eleven…

  3. Rockin’ fix! After the knob stripped, I thought this compressor might be toast. I had borrowed it from a friend who swore by it and had used it for years; it took me about 5 minutes to bust it! Anyway, this fix was right on and saved me from needing to buy her a new one. Thanks for posting it and the regulator part link worked great. You folks are awesome!

  4. Followed the instructions, was surprised that for $15 I got all the components mounted on the regulator manifold, did not have to re-use anything from the old assembly.

  5. I stripped the screw on my pressure regulator knob and could not maintain air pressure. I Google how to replace a pressure regulator on a Husky Air Scout and got you guys. I ordered the part from ordertree.com for fifteen dollars and went to work. Your step by step directions, photos and tools needed was perfection. It made everything easy and I did not miss a step. I could not done it without you guys. Thanks a million!!

  6. Thank you for documenting this so clearly. Finding all the screws to open up a unit like this is half the battle. All went smoothly. I wish that the supplier furnished a hose clamp with the manifold. I reused the single use clamp that was on the original assembly and now I’m crossing my fingers. I’m fixing this at work. I backed up the clamp with a wire tie since there are no hose clamps here. Hopefully it will not blow out.

    Thanks again!

    John

  7. Does anyone know where to get the Air Hose from the Tank to the Regulator. All else is fine on my unit.
    Just a cracked hose. Put in another hose but when you bend it to fit it kink at the turn and will limit the air flow and I suspect where out the unit much faster. Anyway just trying to find an original replacment part.

  8. The problem with tapping the existing threads to the regulator is that the steel bolt as already stripped the threads in the softer pot metal and has resulted in an over-sized hole that is needed for proper tapping. Cutting new threads in the larger hole is at best a temporary solution.

    The ordertree.com link still works and for $15, it allows one to get some more life out of the compressor, until the regulator threads strip again. For another $1, the manufacturer could have put a threaded steel insert in the pot metal and that would have permanently solved the problem. Oh well. It is what it is and no more than I use it, it serves my purposes.

  9. Hi, everyone!

    I have the same unit (which I picked up for FREE from a neighbor) and he says he doesn’t know if it’s the power switch or not and it would only start some times. Well, few months later, plugged it in and it’s not starting. Bought the switch and it’s not starting either…. So, what could be the problem? HELP?

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