Quick teardown- what’s inside a Home Depot 7in LED Easy light

I stumbled on these lights at the local Home Depot store this weekend, and was intrigues by the price ($9.95 despite being listed at $20 online) and also the versatility. You can simply screw one into an exposed lamp holder and end up with a fixture instead of a bare bulb, while also using a lot less energy.Or you can use a supplied socket with a pigtail and wire it to a ceiling box. In my case, I was looking to improve garage lighting. A single 60W bulb was just not cutting it and I am not a big user of fluorescents. These things being small and light but also enclosed would be a good choice there

Retail box front

Retail box front

Retail box back

Retail box back

The specs are not too bad- 830 Lumens at 11.5W, 4000K- coolish for my taste, but it’s a garage after all.

What’s inside?

The top cover twists off easily and we are left with a basic round board full of LEDs:

Regular substrate and 24 LEDs

Regular substrate and 24 LEDs

The board has three strings of 8 LEDs in each, connected in parallel. The only cooling appears to be largish copper traces under each LED. I guess they are not being driven too hard here. The LEDs look similar to Seul Semi 5630 series with its four leaded package.

The board is single sided:

Not even cooling vias or traces on this side. Designed down to price

Not even cooling vias or traces on this side. Designed down to price

The back of the unit has the usual warning labels and the bulb threads :

With the LED board lifted, we get access to the driver module

LED driver board

LED driver board

Driver module- bottom side

Driver module- bottom side. Input is on the right, output- on the left

Driver board- top side

Driver board- top side

Input section

Input section- looks reasonable with a  fuse, Mov and some filtering

Main switching FET AUK SMK0460

Main switching FET AUK SMK0460

This is a 600V NMOS FET (Datasheet is here)

Aishi caps, 105C

Aishi RS caps, 105C, 4000-10000 hrs life

Output caps

Output caps, Aishi RE series 105C 4000 hours

National Semi driver

National Semi driver

Output stage

Output stage

Things look nicely isolated and designed reasonably well.

Now, on to some measurements:

It's a bit bright over here

It’s a bit bright over here

When powered, the LEDs run at around 25.6V, resulting in around 3.2V per LED. The LEDs are driven at 340mA total, or 113mA per string.

Total LED current

Total LED current

At 113mA per string, if we stick with the above assumption of LEDs being Seul Semi 5630  parts, we are looking at 35 Lumens  or more per device, or about 830 total

Power consumption- 13W

Power consumption- 13W

The specs list 11.5W and I tend to believe that- Kill-A-Watt after all is not a precision instrument

Power factor 0.99

Power factor 0.99

Conclusion

Cover on, power on

Cover on, power on

I like the design- clean, well built and using reasonably good parts. There is very little manual labor- just soldering the wires. Everything else looks wave or reflow soldered. Granted this is not an omnidirectional fixture, but for a downfacing application like a garage, that’s actually a plus. No need to shine on the rafters after all.

Currently playing an electrician and installing a bunch of these in my garage.

 

 

 

 

 

2 thoughts on “Quick teardown- what’s inside a Home Depot 7in LED Easy light

  1. Pingback: Quick teardown- what’s inside a Home Depot 7in LED Easy light « adafruit industries blog

  2. The Kill A Watt is not exactly True RMS. Better off with a Fluke 87 V meter and do the math for VA.

    Square wave inputs are not exactly nice to most meter units and a switcher into LED is definitely not sinusoidal we discovered the very newest Fluke scope meter is the only one that can input from a 6 pulse variable speed drive and do the math even though the 5 year old one should have been able to. Turns out switchers have progressed to much sharper switching than people thought would happen. Better semi’s better transformers demand for energy efficiency. I am however surprised to see non solid electrolytic caps. Remember heat and freezing are the enemies of caps. (Yes just like a pop can in a car in the North.)

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